For nearly two decades, Heather Taussig, PhD and her colleagues have produced promising results through the Kempe Center’s Fostering Healthy Futures program. Fostering Healthy Futures (FHF) is a positive youth development program that employs 1:1 mentoring, and group-based skills training to promote healthy youth development and reduce trauma-related symptoms and behaviors among youths facing adversity. Since the program’s launch, it has consistently progressed and promoted positive outcomes for children and teens in Colorado and beyond.

As the FHF program continues to evolve, we are optimistic about the new partnerships and funding sources that will bring more opportunities for its expansion. We recently connected with Jessica Corvinus, Director of Dissemination for the FHF program, to learn more about what’s ahead.

New Partnerships

For years, the Fostering Healthy Futures program has been a service provided directly through the Kempe Center. In order to expand the program’s reach to include more children, youth and families, FHF has shifted their focus to training, implementation and dissemination. 

In this growth phase, it is important that FHF is intentional about the organizations they select to be the stewards of the program. In order to identify sites that would execute this program successfully, the Kempe Center performs a readiness assessment on each prospective organization. This assessment accounts for the organization’s values, capacity and potential to successfully run and sustain the FHF program. 

Most recently, FHF has partnered with Colorado-based social services organizations Lutheran Family Services and Adoption Options. After being evaluated through FHF’s readiness assessment, these organizations were selected due to their enthusiasm, commitment and ability to successfully run the program. Following training from the FHF team, Lutheran Family Services and Adoption Options will begin implementing the program in the fall of 2021. 

Increased Funding

To ensure that new organizations are successful in their implementation of FHF, the Kempe Foundation has secured program funding from a variety of sources. One of these funding sources is the Tony Grampsas Youth Services Program Grant (TGYS) through the Colorado Department of Human Services. This statutory program provides funding through grants to local organizations for prevention, intervention and education programs to youth and their families. The TGYS grant will fund the implementation of FHF at Lutheran Family Services and Adoption Options in the fall, as well as support FHF staff through these training and dissemination efforts. 

In addition to the TGYS grant, FHF is hopeful that they will qualify for funding through the Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA). In order to qualify for this funding, FHF had to receive a certain rating from the Title IV- E Prevention Services Clearinghouse – a rating system specifically designed for FFPSA. 

A program is rated on the quality of the program design and the outcomes of their studies and is reimbursed if they fit into the top two tiers of the rating system. The ratings include well-supported, supported, promising and does not meet criteria. Because the FHF Preteen program conducted two randomized controlled trials with demonstrated short- and long-term effects, it has been awarded a rating of well-supported, which should allow it to qualify for funding through FFPSA.

Looking Ahead

As we look to the future, we are hopeful that FHF will continue to expand to serve more children, youth and families across the country. In order to make this happen, FHF will need to build out a research and dissemination infrastructure to guarantee stable, successful growth. The Kempe Foundation is committed to supporting the Kempe Center as they advance this work. As the potential for more federal funding comes through FFPSA, it is incumbent upon the Foundation to raise money for FHF and the Kempe Center so that we can continue to provide youth with access to positive, empowering, and growth-promoting programming.