Topic: Child Abuse and Neglect

Empowering Survivors to Move Forward with Hope and Dignity

Brittany* was 15 when she was referred to Extended Hands of Hope by a caseworker from Jefferson County’s Department of Human Services. She had been in and out of jail since the age of nine, had a history of running away, and was grades behind in both math and reading. On top of this, her severe depression was fueled by drug and alcohol addiction.

It took Brittany about two months before she allowed the Extended Hands of Hope team to help her. She struggled with the structure and process of the program, refusing therapy and every service offered by her caseworker. Her trauma was so deep that she even rejected personal hygiene and would gnaw on her own hair because of nervousness.

Eventually, Brittany began substance abuse treatment, counseling and therapy. She took a shower for the first time in months, and attended Extended Hands of Hope’s licensed, on-site school, Forward Learning Academy. She successfully made it through every phase of the program, and by the time she finished, she was re-enrolled in school, applying for jobs and reunited with her mom. Brittany also continued therapy after she left and regularly attended substance abuse support groups.

Had Brittany not come to a trauma-informed facility like Extended Hands of Hope, she would have been presumed defiant by the courts and ended up in jail, back under control of a pimp, or dead. Extended Hands of Hope protects young girls like Brittany who have been recovered from sex trafficking and exploitation and provides them with safe homes and a strong support team to help them heal and develop long-term survivorship skills. By fostering a trusting and supportive environment, these young girls are able to move forward into a new beginning.

Join us October 4 for a panel discussion with Extended Hands of Hope and other experts to learn more about what is being done in Colorado to protect our vulnerable youth. Register here.

*Brittany is a fictional name used to protect the identity of the survivor. 

Child Welfare Training System introduces new training to help prevent child maltreatment fatalities

This fall, Colorado’s Child Welfare Training System will launch a new training for child welfare supervisors and managers – ‘Sleep Tight the Kids Are Alright,’ a reference to the sleepless nights caseworkers and supervisors endure worrying that they are making the right decisions to serve and protect the children under their watch and prevent the worst possible outcome. The course uses case study scenarios and data from child fatality cases in Colorado and provides a space for child welfare supervisors to analyze the events that led to a tragic ending in an effort to prevent similar outcomes in the future.

Since 2013, the Kempe Center has worked alongside the Colorado Department of Human Services to revolutionize the Child Welfare Training System (CWTS). Through leadership and learning, Kempe and CDHS are profoundly and positively impacting Colorado’s children and families through the transformation of the system.

Read more about Sleep Tight the Kids Are Alright.

Kempe, Haruv Institute Launch Innovative Journal to Keep Children Safe

The Kempe Foundation, The Kempe Center, and The Haruv Institute have joined to establish a groundbreaking international journal on child abuse and neglect.
The International Journal on Child Maltreatment: Research, Policy, and Practice will begin publication during the third quarter of 2018. It will be published by Springer Nature, one of the world’s largest scientific publishers, from its office in Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

The journal’s editorial management will be undertaken by The Kempe Center. Based at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, The Kempe Center is supported in its work, including the new journal, by The Kempe Foundation. The principal international partner in the financing and sponsorship of journal is The Haruv Institute, Israel’s leading center for training and research on the protection of children and an active catalyst in international scholarship on child abuse and neglect.

The journal’s stated purpose is the improvement of “policy and practice related to the fulfillment of children’s right to personal security—the protection of children’s physical safety, the promotion of their sense of security, and the assurance of their receiving care sufficient for fulfillment of their basic needs in the settings of everyday life.”

It will include descriptions and reviews of child protection programs and policies and evaluations of their effects, as well as scholarly reports of theory-grounded empirical research on the nature of child maltreatment and its causes and correlates.

Gary B. Melton will be the founding editor-in-chief. He is associate director for community development and social policy at The Kempe Center. He is also professor of pediatrics and of community and behavioral health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and visiting professor of education and psychology at the University of Virginia. Melton is the only recipient of four Distinguished Contributions Awards from the American Psychological Association, among other prestigious national and international honors for scholarship and public service.

Jill D. McLeigh will serve as associate editor. McLeigh is research assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Already an accomplished editor, McLeigh is co-editor of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatryand past associate editor of Child Abuse & Neglect.

“There have been great advances in public concern and knowledge about child maltreatment. However, large gaps persist in the knowledge needed to keep children safe,” said Melton. “Older journals have often emphasized evidence that child maltreatment exists in diverse societies and that it has bad effects on people, both as children and later as adolescents and adults. Such findings by themselves may intensify public concern about child maltreatment. However, they seldom result in insights about what should be done to enhance children’s safety and well-being. The new journal will be a forum for presentation and analysis of innovative programs and policies for prevention, control, and mitigation of child abuse and neglect.”
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About The Kempe Foundation
The Kempe Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization focused on the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect. The Kempe Foundation works to keep all children safe and healthy by supporting experts in the field, advocating for children and engaging with communities.

About The Kempe Center
The Center is a section of the Department of Pediatrics in the University of Colorado School of Medicine. It is the oldest clinical care and research center on child abuse and neglect in the world. The Kempe Center provides clinical care and advocacy for child victims, advocacy for policy and prevention efforts, leads national and international research efforts, and provides training of professionals and the public.

About The Haruv Institute
Haruv is Israel’s leading training and research center and one of the preeminent institutions worldwide in the field of child abuse and neglect. The institute was established in 2007 to train professionals, paraprofessionals, researchers, parents and children on the prevention, identification, treatment and rehabilitation of abused and neglected children.

About Springer
Springer is a leading global scientific, technical and medical portfolio, providing researchers in academia, scientific institutions and corporate R&D departments with quality content through innovative information, products and services. Springer has one of the strongest STM and HSS eBook collections and archives, as well as a comprehensive range of hybrid and open access journals. Springer is part of Springer Nature, a global publisher that serves and supports the research community. Springer Nature aims to advance discovery by publishing robust and insightful science, supporting the development of new areas of research and making ideas and knowledge accessible around the world.

Child Protection Team Celebrates 60 Years

“Henry Kempe and Brandt Steele had the right vision when founding the CPT in 1958 and The Kempe Center in 1972. They may not have known it then, but they were to become true visionary heroes to us all,” – Dr. Andrew Sirotnak

 

 

In 1958, the first multidisciplinary Child Protection Teams (CPTs) were formed. This year marks 60 years of progress in the recognition and response to child maltreatment. As we look to April as Child Abuse Prevention Month and to celebrate this accomplishment, we also reflect on the history of child maltreatment, to anticipate the many more children we will care for, and to consider further prevention models for our communities.

The concept of hospital-based child protection “teams” started with C. Henry Kempe, M.D. of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver and two of his colleagues, Betty Elmer, M.S.W, of the Pittsburgh Children’s Hospital, and Helen Broadman, M.S.W., of the Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles. This shared effort to address the problem of child abuse laid the ground work for a tradition of support for children in need of protection.

Dr. Kempe established the first of these child protection teams in the country with his colleagues and today over 1,000 such teams now exist in the U.S. and abroad. Through this effort began Dr. Kempe’s quest to protect the abused and neglected child and his work as America’s pioneer in the field.

Learn more about the history of the Child Protection Team.

Our Impact in FY 2017

The Kempe Foundation’s vision is to ensure that all children have the opportunity to develop and grow in a safe, healthy and nurturing environment.

We believe that through awareness, knowledge and research we can make enormous strides in meeting the challenges children face as the result of child abuse and neglect.

In FY17, we directly served children in nearly every county in Colorado. We also provided coaching and consultation for professionals in many states outside of Colorado.

We invite you to learn more about our impact in our FY 2017 Annual Report.

Our metrics, however, are only a starting point. The total impact of Kempe’s work and the number of children and families helped is immeasurable. With the generous support of donors, Kempe is able to create the right mix of supporting experts in the field, community engagement and advocacy to have a lasting and profound impact on thousands of children and families.

Thank you for your commitment to ensuring all children have the opportunity to develop and grow in a safe, healthy and nurturing environment.

Sincerely,

John Faught
President & CEO
The Kempe Foundation