Topic: Child Abuse and Neglect

Kempe, Haruv Institute Launch Innovative Journal to Keep Children Safe

The Kempe Foundation, The Kempe Center, and The Haruv Institute have joined to establish a groundbreaking international journal on child abuse and neglect.
The International Journal on Child Maltreatment: Research, Policy, and Practice will begin publication during the third quarter of 2018. It will be published by Springer Nature, one of the world’s largest scientific publishers, from its office in Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

The journal’s editorial management will be undertaken by The Kempe Center. Based at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, The Kempe Center is supported in its work, including the new journal, by The Kempe Foundation. The principal international partner in the financing and sponsorship of journal is The Haruv Institute, Israel’s leading center for training and research on the protection of children and an active catalyst in international scholarship on child abuse and neglect.

The journal’s stated purpose is the improvement of “policy and practice related to the fulfillment of children’s right to personal security—the protection of children’s physical safety, the promotion of their sense of security, and the assurance of their receiving care sufficient for fulfillment of their basic needs in the settings of everyday life.”

It will include descriptions and reviews of child protection programs and policies and evaluations of their effects, as well as scholarly reports of theory-grounded empirical research on the nature of child maltreatment and its causes and correlates.

Gary B. Melton will be the founding editor-in-chief. He is associate director for community development and social policy at The Kempe Center. He is also professor of pediatrics and of community and behavioral health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and visiting professor of education and psychology at the University of Virginia. Melton is the only recipient of four Distinguished Contributions Awards from the American Psychological Association, among other prestigious national and international honors for scholarship and public service.

Jill D. McLeigh will serve as associate editor. McLeigh is research assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Already an accomplished editor, McLeigh is co-editor of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatryand past associate editor of Child Abuse & Neglect.

“There have been great advances in public concern and knowledge about child maltreatment. However, large gaps persist in the knowledge needed to keep children safe,” said Melton. “Older journals have often emphasized evidence that child maltreatment exists in diverse societies and that it has bad effects on people, both as children and later as adolescents and adults. Such findings by themselves may intensify public concern about child maltreatment. However, they seldom result in insights about what should be done to enhance children’s safety and well-being. The new journal will be a forum for presentation and analysis of innovative programs and policies for prevention, control, and mitigation of child abuse and neglect.”
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About The Kempe Foundation
The Kempe Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization focused on the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect. The Kempe Foundation works to keep all children safe and healthy by supporting experts in the field, advocating for children and engaging with communities.

About The Kempe Center
The Center is a section of the Department of Pediatrics in the University of Colorado School of Medicine. It is the oldest clinical care and research center on child abuse and neglect in the world. The Kempe Center provides clinical care and advocacy for child victims, advocacy for policy and prevention efforts, leads national and international research efforts, and provides training of professionals and the public.

About The Haruv Institute
Haruv is Israel’s leading training and research center and one of the preeminent institutions worldwide in the field of child abuse and neglect. The institute was established in 2007 to train professionals, paraprofessionals, researchers, parents and children on the prevention, identification, treatment and rehabilitation of abused and neglected children.

About Springer
Springer is a leading global scientific, technical and medical portfolio, providing researchers in academia, scientific institutions and corporate R&D departments with quality content through innovative information, products and services. Springer has one of the strongest STM and HSS eBook collections and archives, as well as a comprehensive range of hybrid and open access journals. Springer is part of Springer Nature, a global publisher that serves and supports the research community. Springer Nature aims to advance discovery by publishing robust and insightful science, supporting the development of new areas of research and making ideas and knowledge accessible around the world.

Child Protection Team Celebrates 60 Years

“Henry Kempe and Brandt Steele had the right vision when founding the CPT in 1958 and The Kempe Center in 1972. They may not have known it then, but they were to become true visionary heroes to us all,” – Dr. Andrew Sirotnak

 

 

In 1958, the first multidisciplinary Child Protection Teams (CPTs) were formed. This year marks 60 years of progress in the recognition and response to child maltreatment. As we look to April as Child Abuse Prevention Month and to celebrate this accomplishment, we also reflect on the history of child maltreatment, to anticipate the many more children we will care for, and to consider further prevention models for our communities.

The concept of hospital-based child protection “teams” started with C. Henry Kempe, M.D. of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver and two of his colleagues, Betty Elmer, M.S.W, of the Pittsburgh Children’s Hospital, and Helen Broadman, M.S.W., of the Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles. This shared effort to address the problem of child abuse laid the ground work for a tradition of support for children in need of protection.

Dr. Kempe established the first of these child protection teams in the country with his colleagues and today over 1,000 such teams now exist in the U.S. and abroad. Through this effort began Dr. Kempe’s quest to protect the abused and neglected child and his work as America’s pioneer in the field.

Learn more about the history of the Child Protection Team.

Our Impact in FY 2017

The Kempe Foundation’s vision is to ensure that all children have the opportunity to develop and grow in a safe, healthy and nurturing environment.

We believe that through awareness, knowledge and research we can make enormous strides in meeting the challenges children face as the result of child abuse and neglect.

In FY17, we directly served children in nearly every county in Colorado. We also provided coaching and consultation for professionals in many states outside of Colorado.

We invite you to learn more about our impact in our FY 2017 Annual Report.

Our metrics, however, are only a starting point. The total impact of Kempe’s work and the number of children and families helped is immeasurable. With the generous support of donors, Kempe is able to create the right mix of supporting experts in the field, community engagement and advocacy to have a lasting and profound impact on thousands of children and families.

Thank you for your commitment to ensuring all children have the opportunity to develop and grow in a safe, healthy and nurturing environment.

Sincerely,

John Faught
President & CEO
The Kempe Foundation

Governor Hickenlooper signs HB 1220 limiting plant grows into law

One of Kempe’s top priorities during the 2017 legislative session included closing loopholes in Colorado’s medical marijuana laws that led to illegal diversion of marijuana out of state, dangerous marijuana home grows, and growing challenges in the ability of law enforcement to respond to these concerns. The Kempe Foundation joined a coalition led by the Governor’s Office and including law enforcement agencies, the public health community, and other county and city agencies to introduce two pieces of legislation designed to close these loopholes.

HB 1220 capped the number of marijuana plants allowed to be grown in a residential home at 12 unless a caregiver registers with their local and state government. The bill also put in place criminal consequences for growing more plants than the cap allows.

HB 1221 created a grant program for law enforcement agencies in communities with fewer than 200,000 residents to be used for marijuana enforcement.

Kempe’s John Faught joined Governor Hickenlooper at the bill signing for HB 1220 and HB 1221 on Thursday, June 8. Kempe applauds legislators for taking these important steps towards closing loopholes that have allowed the dangerous marijuana gray market to flourish in Colorado.

A letter from Des Runyan: 7 Steps to Prevent Child Abuse

Every year, since 1983, The US has designated April as Child Abuse Prevention Month.  This annual public awareness campaign seeks to educate the public about the problems of child abuse and neglect. Committed agencies and professionals hold public gatherings, place pinwheels and ribbons in public places, and create public service announcements to bring attention to abuse and neglect. Usually, we talking to the choir- our April gatherings are attended by the professionals we work with every day. Surveys of the public indicate that over 97% already recognize child abuse as a problem. Our calling attention to child abuse isn’t fixing it.  We need some additional substantive steps to reduce the burden of 7.2 million children reported to authorities in 2015 with 683,000 children confirmed as abused or neglected by social service agencies. The key to effective prevention is engineering the family environment to support and protect children and their parents. Here are 7 concrete steps we must take to really prevent child abuse and neglect:

  • Reduce domestic violence: Data from longitudinal studies are clear, both men and women are perpetrators and victims of intimate partner violence (ipv) and households where there is IPV are at increased risk for physical and psychological abuse perpetrated by both the perpetrators and the victims of IPV. We are moving the needle on this one, IPV has fallen over 70% in the US since 1993. Continued efforts to reduce violence between partners really benefits children.
  • Build social networks among young families: Isolation, post-partum depression, poverty, and stress are a deadly in combination. Humans are social animals. Support in terms of: group well child care, expanded community engagement and other efforts to support new families and establish connections will reduce the risk of harm.
  • Get serious about reducing prenatal exposure to substances by enhancing screening and treatment: Alcohol is a clear and established threat to the development of young children and it interferes with effective parenting. Much less research has been done with prenatal exposure to marijuana but the studies to date indicate increased risks to the fetus in terms of subsequent mental retardation. Both substances can interfere with parental caregiving. Screening and treatment done in a non-punitive manner are much more likely to help the child and sustain families.
  • Make access to home visitors such as public health nurses or SafeCare counselors routine for all new parents under 22 years of age triggered by the registrations of births: The Nurse Family Partnership and SafeCare are two home visiting programs for families with young children that have been shown to have many benefits in terms of reduced use of medical care, greater child safety, and better outcomes for mothers.  Both are well established in Colorado but only about a third of families offered these services use them. We need to link these services to newborn nurseries and doctor’s offices and make the benefits clear to the participants.
  • Advance girl’s education: The strong correlation between maternal years of education and rates of harsh punishment and shaking of their young children is clear. We need programs and policies that keep girls in school and help complete their education. Not only are children get maltreated less by more educated parents, they have advanced communication skills, finish school at higher rates, and have lower rates of other adverse childhood experiences.
  • Delay childbearing: Closely related to number 1, teens who have access to Long-acting reversible contraceptives and who delay childbearing until after age 20 are less likely to use harsh punishment, are more empathetic to their children’s needs, and have higher incomes. Their children are much more likely to prosper.
  • Establish family-friendly business practices: Kids need parental investment and care.  Paid maternal leave has been shown to significantly reduce shaken baby syndrome and the benefits of parents being able to attend school functions, teacher conferences, and child sports activities are well-known.

So, let’s make April the start of some very concrete steps that will reduce child abuse. I realize that this might put our Kempe Center out of business but won’t that be great for kids and society when we are no longer needed.

Des Runyan, MD

Executive Director, The Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect