Topic: Child Abuse and Neglect

Kempe Partners with Colorado Department of Human Services to Fund, Expand SafeCare® Across Colorado

In May, Colorado Department of Human Services (CDHS) Office of Early Childhood announced it had secured $5 million in funding to continue operation of SafeCare® Colorado. Through this funding, Kempe will continue managing SafeCare® on behalf of CDHS through a five-year renewable contract.

Since 2013, Kempe has partnered with the CDHS to implement SafeCare® through a multi-phase rollout. Today, SafeCare® is available in 11 community organizations in 39 counties and two tribal nations. As part of this new contract with Kempe, the SafeCare® program will expand to include two additional sites in two additional Colorado counties by the end of fiscal year 2016-2017.

Based on an internationally recognized, evidence-based, in-home parent support program, the goal of SafeCare® is to prevent families from entering or re-entering the child welfare system by providing direct skills training to parents and caregivers. SafeCare® has adopted this model to create a flexible, free and voluntary parent support program for parents and caregivers with children ages five and under who need extra support to keep their families safe and healthy.

“We are thrilled to continue our work implementing the proven best practices of the SafeCare® model in Colorado, and grateful to the Colorado Department of Human Services for entrusting Kempe to continue our management of this important and much needed program,” said Katherine L. Casillas, Ph.D., Director of SafeCare®. “Children under the age of three are at the greatest risk for being victims of fatal child abuse. The direct skills training provided through SafeCare® to the most at-risk populations in our state is needed to help reduce this risk and keep our young children safe.”

Under the new contract, the Kempe SafeCare® team will continue to fulfill the role of SafeCare® Colorado Program Intermediary, facilitating activities required to support, assist and coordinate with CDHS to monitor home visitation and related services performed through the SafeCare® program.

As part of its mission to provide education, advocacy and fundraising to support the The Kempe Center, The Kempe Foundation played an integral role in securing the renewed SafeCare® contract. Throughout fiscal year 2015-2016, Kempe’s leadership advocated for funding to be renewed to support this important program.

As stated by John Faught, President & CEO of The Kempe Foundation, “We are very gratified that The Kempe Center will continue management of the SafeCare® Colorado program as the team in place represents the highest caliber of expertise within the child advocacy arena. Their knowledge and vision for this program are integral to keeping children safe in our state.”

Visit safecareco.co4kids.org to learn more.

New SafeCare® Colorado Sites

  • Ute Mountain Ute program, serving tribal families who reside on the Ute Mountain Ute or Southern Ute reservations, as well as any registered member of a federally recognized tribe in the southwestern corner of the state who may not be living on either reservation.
  • Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association, serving Moffat and Routt counties.

Continued SafeCare® Colorado Sites

  • Baby Bear Hugs, serving Cheyenne, Elbert, Kit Carson, Lincoln, Logan, Morgan, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington, and Yuma counties.
  • Mesa County Health Department, serving Mesa County.
    Montezuma County Public Health Department, serving Archuleta, Dolores, La Plata, Montezuma, and San Juan counties, the Southern Ute Indian Tribe and Ute Mountain Ute Tribe.
  • Savio House, serving Denver County.
  • Arapahoe County Early Childhood Council, serving Arapahoe County.
  • Catholic Charities Diocese of Pueblo, serving Pueblo, Custer, Huerfano, and Las Animas counties.
  • High Plains Community Health Center, serving Baca, Bent, Crowley, Kiowa, Otero, and Prowers counties.
  • The Family Tree serving Adams, Douglas, and Jefferson counties.
  • La Llave Family Resource Center, serving Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, Mineral, Rio Grande, and Saguache counties.
  • Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains, serving El Paso County.
  • North Range Behavioral Health, serving Weld County.

About The Kempe Foundation
For nearly 40 years, The Kempe Foundation has provided the education, advocacy and fundraising to support the The Kempe Center. Through the work we do under our four CARE pillars – clinical care, advocacy, research and education – we are a part of a game-changing, paradigm shift in the way we think about, talk about and treat child abuse and neglect as a public health crisis. To learn more, visit www.kempe.org.

Kempe Receives $20,000 through the Colorado Rockies Charity Fund

Kempe recently received a $20,000 grant through the Colorado Rockies Charity Fund, a McCormick Foundation Fund. The grant supports the critical work of the IMHOFF Clinic, a behavioral health clinic that provides direct services and consultations to children, families and caregivers.

“This grant enables Kempe to continue providing behavioral health services to children, families and caregivers as they deal with the consequences of abuse and neglect,” says, John Faught, President & CEO of The Kempe Foundation. “The services Kempe provides are an important step in helping children heal and lead healthy lives.”

The IMHOFF Clinic provides services that improve children’s mental health and family function, including mental health evaluation and assessments as part of treatment, individual and family therapy, and case consultation.

“Children who have experienced abuse or neglect are at a greater risk for developing depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder,” says Dr. Erika McElroy, associate director of behavioral health services at Kempe. “IMHOFF Clinic’s professional, trained staff gives our patients the tools to address these challenges and restores hope to children and their families. We are grateful to the Colorado Rockies Charity Fund for believing in our work and in our clients.”

The Colorado Rockies Charity Fund distributed $220,000 to 10 Denver-based nonprofits, including Kempe.

Kempe Making a Tremendous Difference

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Thanks to the work of thousands of individuals and organizations, including Kempe, the latest reports indicate a 40% reduction in child abuse and neglect nationally over the past two decades. While there have been tremendous advances to keeping children safe, there is still much more work to do.

The information outlined in this report shows the impact our staff is making. In the past year alone, Kempe has connected with hundreds of mental and medical health professionals, child welfare professionals, scholars and other organizations in the fight to end child abuse and neglect.

In FY 2015, Kempe staff made a tremendous difference including:

  • Providing clinical care services to 2,008 children and 632 adults
  • Securing $11 million in state grants
  • Publishing 28 articles and completing 10 research papers
  • Training 5,257 child welfare professionals

We encourage you to read more about our professionals and their impact in our 2015 Kempe CARES for Children Annual Report. Because of your support, we are able to continue this crucial work. Thank you for caring for children.

John D. Faught, JD, President & CEO, The Kempe Foundation
Desmond K. Runyan, MD, DrPH, Executive Director, The Kempe Center

Kempe Announces New Vice-Chair and Board Members

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Aurora, CO (Oct. 12, 2015) – The Kempe Foundation, a leader in the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect, announces the appointment of a new vice chair and six new members to serve on its board of directors.

John Kellogg was elected vice-chair of Kempe’s board of directors. He will succeed Bill Mackiernan, as chairman of the board in July 2017. Kellogg is a business attorney at Moye White, LLP where he counsels evolving companies in corporate, finance, securities and development matters. He is passionate about advancing Kempe’s work to care for children.

Kempe also appointed six new board members: C.J. Chapman, Esq., Kevin MacCary, Chris Matuszynski, Jesse Ogas, Colorado State Representative Angela Williams, and Christine Wanifuchi.

C.J. Chapman, Esq. is an attorney and shareholder with Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck. He is actively involved with several community organizations and is a positive role model for Denver youth. The law firm has a long history of supporting Kempe by providing pro-bono legal services.

Kevin MacCary is vice president, Office of Internal Governance, and general counsel for United Launch Alliance (ULA). He served in the U.S. Army, and, as a reservist, served on the staff of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD)/U.S. Northern Command before retiring with the rank of colonel. He serves on the board for Volunteers of America – Colorado, coaches a special-needs soccer team, provides pro bono services at legal clinics, teaches Junior Achievement and encourages volunteerism at ULA.

Chris Matuszynski has over 20 years of experience in IT security, risk management, audit, systems development/implementations and business. He currently works for QEP Resources, and brings vital IT expertise to Kempe. Chris has a passion for children and their well-being.

Jesse Ogas is the executive director of Firefly Autism. Prior to Firefly Autism, he worked with Arc Thrift Stores and several major retailors. He is an active community volunteer, and is a Commissioner with the Mayor’s Latino Commission in Denver. He is committed to children’s issues and to creating collaborative partnerships to bridge the gap between the nonprofit sector and communities of color.

Colorado State Representative Angela Williams represents a dynamic and diverse community in House District 7. She is the Majority Caucus Chair; Chair of the Business, Labor, Economic & Workforce Development Committee; and a member of the Legislative Council Committee. She is actively engaged with issues impacting families and children, and brings public policy and fundraising experience to the board.

Christine Wanifuchi is the chief executive officer for the Asian Pacific Development Center. Throughout her career, she has served in various executive positions with both for-profit and nonprofit organizations. She is an active community volunteer, and is committed to children’s issues and creating a better community for all families.

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About Kempe
Kempe’s growing work in Clinical Care, Advocacy, Research and Education is part of a game changing paradigm shift in the way we think about, talk about and treat child abuse and neglect. To support our mission to care for children and learn more about Kempe, visit www.kempe.org.

Impact of Domestic Violence on Parenting

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How does being a victim of domestic violence affect parenting?

This is the question Kempe is researching as part of a systematic review of the literature, a rigorous analysis examining all previous related research in order to synthesize the results.

Leading the project is Dr. Antonia Chiesa, with Kempe and Children’s Hospital Colorado Child Protection Team, who says, “We want to find out if there are residual effects from domestic violence even after the violence stops. “Simply removing the victim from the situation may not limit the impact, ” Dr. Chiesa added.

This project, now in its second year, is the first systematic review conducted at Kempe. Kempe experts from cross disciplines have been involved including a social worker, mental health professionals, pediatricians and doctors. Kempe also engaged leading systematic review expert Dr. Sabine Maguire at the University of Cardiff in Wales to assist with the project.

The process involves sifting through multiple databases to find studies and articles related to this topic and conducting an initial review of every relevant abstract – the team found more than 4000.

After the initial review, the Kempe team scanned 400 full studies to determine if the information was specific to this topic – they found over 100 potential studies.

Next, the research team conducted a critical review of each study to ensure that studies met narrowly defined inclusion criteria. These criteria are developed in order to assess quality of the research and ensure that the study answers the specific question.

“This has been a huge undertaking with many people on our staff spending time outside regular work hours to complete the study,” Chiesa said. “As we examine the research, we are noticing a differences in parenting discipline and research design methods – all of which must be accounted for in our evaluation.” Results are not final as the review is not complete. Preliminarily, it appears that domestic violence victimization may impact parenting. The results of the review will explore how this occurs and the strength of current evidence.

Kempe is in the process of documenting the findings and expects to publish the results of the review in 2016.