Topic: Child Abuse Experts

Child Protection Team Celebrates 60 Years

“Henry Kempe and Brandt Steele had the right vision when founding the CPT in 1958 and The Kempe Center in 1972. They may not have known it then, but they were to become true visionary heroes to us all,” – Dr. Andrew Sirotnak

 

 

In 1958, the first multidisciplinary Child Protection Teams (CPTs) were formed. This year marks 60 years of progress in the recognition and response to child maltreatment. As we look to April as Child Abuse Prevention Month and to celebrate this accomplishment, we also reflect on the history of child maltreatment, to anticipate the many more children we will care for, and to consider further prevention models for our communities.

The concept of hospital-based child protection “teams” started with C. Henry Kempe, M.D. of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver and two of his colleagues, Betty Elmer, M.S.W, of the Pittsburgh Children’s Hospital, and Helen Broadman, M.S.W., of the Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles. This shared effort to address the problem of child abuse laid the ground work for a tradition of support for children in need of protection.

Dr. Kempe established the first of these child protection teams in the country with his colleagues and today over 1,000 such teams now exist in the U.S. and abroad. Through this effort began Dr. Kempe’s quest to protect the abused and neglected child and his work as America’s pioneer in the field.

Learn more about the history of the Child Protection Team.

5280 Names Kempe Professionals "Top Docs"

Kempe is home to many dedicated, passionate and thoughtful professionals who are recognized as experts in the field of child abuse and neglect prevention and treatment.

It is no surprise several of our doctors were once again included on 5280 magazine’s list of “Top Docs.”

We would like to congratulate the following docs who are a part of the Kempe team:

Dr. Andrew Sirotnak, Child Abuse Pediatrics

Dr. Antonia Chiesa, Child Abuse Pediatrics

Dr. Kathryn Wells, Child Abuse Pediatrics

A letter from Des Runyan: 7 Steps to Prevent Child Abuse

Every year, since 1983, The US has designated April as Child Abuse Prevention Month.  This annual public awareness campaign seeks to educate the public about the problems of child abuse and neglect. Committed agencies and professionals hold public gatherings, place pinwheels and ribbons in public places, and create public service announcements to bring attention to abuse and neglect. Usually, we talking to the choir- our April gatherings are attended by the professionals we work with every day. Surveys of the public indicate that over 97% already recognize child abuse as a problem. Our calling attention to child abuse isn’t fixing it.  We need some additional substantive steps to reduce the burden of 7.2 million children reported to authorities in 2015 with 683,000 children confirmed as abused or neglected by social service agencies. The key to effective prevention is engineering the family environment to support and protect children and their parents. Here are 7 concrete steps we must take to really prevent child abuse and neglect:

  • Reduce domestic violence: Data from longitudinal studies are clear, both men and women are perpetrators and victims of intimate partner violence (ipv) and households where there is IPV are at increased risk for physical and psychological abuse perpetrated by both the perpetrators and the victims of IPV. We are moving the needle on this one, IPV has fallen over 70% in the US since 1993. Continued efforts to reduce violence between partners really benefits children.
  • Build social networks among young families: Isolation, post-partum depression, poverty, and stress are a deadly in combination. Humans are social animals. Support in terms of: group well child care, expanded community engagement and other efforts to support new families and establish connections will reduce the risk of harm.
  • Get serious about reducing prenatal exposure to substances by enhancing screening and treatment: Alcohol is a clear and established threat to the development of young children and it interferes with effective parenting. Much less research has been done with prenatal exposure to marijuana but the studies to date indicate increased risks to the fetus in terms of subsequent mental retardation. Both substances can interfere with parental caregiving. Screening and treatment done in a non-punitive manner are much more likely to help the child and sustain families.
  • Make access to home visitors such as public health nurses or SafeCare counselors routine for all new parents under 22 years of age triggered by the registrations of births: The Nurse Family Partnership and SafeCare are two home visiting programs for families with young children that have been shown to have many benefits in terms of reduced use of medical care, greater child safety, and better outcomes for mothers.  Both are well established in Colorado but only about a third of families offered these services use them. We need to link these services to newborn nurseries and doctor’s offices and make the benefits clear to the participants.
  • Advance girl’s education: The strong correlation between maternal years of education and rates of harsh punishment and shaking of their young children is clear. We need programs and policies that keep girls in school and help complete their education. Not only are children get maltreated less by more educated parents, they have advanced communication skills, finish school at higher rates, and have lower rates of other adverse childhood experiences.
  • Delay childbearing: Closely related to number 1, teens who have access to Long-acting reversible contraceptives and who delay childbearing until after age 20 are less likely to use harsh punishment, are more empathetic to their children’s needs, and have higher incomes. Their children are much more likely to prosper.
  • Establish family-friendly business practices: Kids need parental investment and care.  Paid maternal leave has been shown to significantly reduce shaken baby syndrome and the benefits of parents being able to attend school functions, teacher conferences, and child sports activities are well-known.

So, let’s make April the start of some very concrete steps that will reduce child abuse. I realize that this might put our Kempe Center out of business but won’t that be great for kids and society when we are no longer needed.

Des Runyan, MD

Executive Director, The Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect

Kempe Making a Tremendous Difference

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Thanks to the work of thousands of individuals and organizations, including Kempe, the latest reports indicate a 40% reduction in child abuse and neglect nationally over the past two decades. While there have been tremendous advances to keeping children safe, there is still much more work to do.

The information outlined in this report shows the impact our staff is making. In the past year alone, Kempe has connected with hundreds of mental and medical health professionals, child welfare professionals, scholars and other organizations in the fight to end child abuse and neglect.

In FY 2015, Kempe staff made a tremendous difference including:

  • Providing clinical care services to 2,008 children and 632 adults
  • Securing $11 million in state grants
  • Publishing 28 articles and completing 10 research papers
  • Training 5,257 child welfare professionals

We encourage you to read more about our professionals and their impact in our 2015 Kempe CARES for Children Annual Report. Because of your support, we are able to continue this crucial work. Thank you for caring for children.

John D. Faught, JD, President & CEO, The Kempe Foundation
Desmond K. Runyan, MD, DrPH, Executive Director, The Kempe Center

Impact of Domestic Violence on Parenting

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How does being a victim of domestic violence affect parenting?

This is the question Kempe is researching as part of a systematic review of the literature, a rigorous analysis examining all previous related research in order to synthesize the results.

Leading the project is Dr. Antonia Chiesa, with Kempe and Children’s Hospital Colorado Child Protection Team, who says, “We want to find out if there are residual effects from domestic violence even after the violence stops. “Simply removing the victim from the situation may not limit the impact, ” Dr. Chiesa added.

This project, now in its second year, is the first systematic review conducted at Kempe. Kempe experts from cross disciplines have been involved including a social worker, mental health professionals, pediatricians and doctors. Kempe also engaged leading systematic review expert Dr. Sabine Maguire at the University of Cardiff in Wales to assist with the project.

The process involves sifting through multiple databases to find studies and articles related to this topic and conducting an initial review of every relevant abstract – the team found more than 4000.

After the initial review, the Kempe team scanned 400 full studies to determine if the information was specific to this topic – they found over 100 potential studies.

Next, the research team conducted a critical review of each study to ensure that studies met narrowly defined inclusion criteria. These criteria are developed in order to assess quality of the research and ensure that the study answers the specific question.

“This has been a huge undertaking with many people on our staff spending time outside regular work hours to complete the study,” Chiesa said. “As we examine the research, we are noticing a differences in parenting discipline and research design methods – all of which must be accounted for in our evaluation.” Results are not final as the review is not complete. Preliminarily, it appears that domestic violence victimization may impact parenting. The results of the review will explore how this occurs and the strength of current evidence.

Kempe is in the process of documenting the findings and expects to publish the results of the review in 2016.