Topic: In the News

The Colorado Sun: Colorado is creating a network of doctors to diagnose child abuse and keep kids from slipping through the safety net

Jennifer Brown from The Colorado Sun reports on the need for the CARE Network, a new program created via legislation this year. The CARE Network will allow the state to build a network of doctors to diagnose child abuse and keep kids from slipping through the safety net. Currently Colorado has just six doctors board certified in child abuse pediatrics all located on the Front Range.

Read about the Kempe Foundation’s work to advocate for this new program and how it will impact Colorado’s children online.

 

Governor Polis Signs Bill to Create Colorado’s First Child Abuse Response and Evaluation Network

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AURORA, CO (May 23, 2019) – The Kempe Center and Foundation are pleased to announce the creation of the Colorado’s Child Abuse Response and Evaluation Network (CARENetwork) by the Colorado Legislature through HB19-1133. The CARENetwork is a program to provide quality assessments for suspected victims of child abuse and neglect by building local capacity in communities. As the Resource Center for the CARENetwork, the Kempe Center will recruit designated health care and behavioral health providers in communities across the state and train them as to the signs of child abuse and neglect and resources available to families to address risks that may lead to child abuse and neglect.

HB19-1133, sponsored by Representatives Caraveo and Pelton and Senator Fields, was signed into law by Governor Jared Polis on May 23, 2019.

“Although the session presented a new political landscape with Democrats in control of the Senate, House, and Governor’s Office, we were able to garner bipartisan support for a number initiatives for improving the safety, health and well-being of children and youth across Colorado,” said John Faught, CEO of The Kempe Foundation. “The CARENetwork will ultimately expand the safety net for children, and likely contribute to a reduction in severe incidents of child abuse and neglect, including fatalities.”

The CARENetwork is a state program within the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), and in coordination with the Colorado Department of Human Services (CDHS).

The Kempe Foundation worked closely with various stakeholders including the CDPHE, CDHS, American Academy of Pediatrics, Children’s Advocacy Centers, Children’s Hospital Colorado and Colorado Children’s Campaign to pass the legislation. The bill received unanimous support in both the House and Senate.

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About The Kempe Foundation
The Kempe Foundation is a 501c (3) nonprofit organization focused on the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect. Kempe works to keep all children safe and healthy by supporting experts in the field, advocating for children and engaging with communities. www.kempe.org

Updates from Under the Gold Dome: May 2019

The Kempe Foundation was very active in the 2019 Legislative Session introducing legislation, advocating for critical funding for Kempe programs, weighing in on important policy changes, and continuing to be a resource for legislators under the Gold Dome.

Although the session presented a new political landscape with Democrats in control of the Senate, House and Governor’s Office, we were able to garner bipartisan support for a number initiatives to improve the safety, health and well-being of children and youth across Colorado. Read on for a summary of our involvement.

Kempe Initiated Legislation

Spearheaded by Dr. Antonia Chiesa and CEO John Faught, The Kempe Center and Foundation partnered to pass House Bill 1133. This bill sponsored by Representatives Caraveo and Pelton, and Senator Fields creates Colorado’s Child Abuse Response and Evaluation Network (CARENetwork), a program to build local capacity to provide quality assessments for suspected victims of child abuse and neglect in their local communities. By recruiting designated providers from communities across the state and training them about the signs of child abuse, the CARENetwork aims to ensure all children for whom physical or sexual abuse or neglect may be suspected receive access to high quality medical evaluations and behavioral health assessments. It also ensures that designated providers will be equipped to provide families information about resources available to help address risks that may lead to abuse or neglect. The Kempe Center will serve as the Resource Center for the CARENetwork

Governor Polis signed House Bill 1133 into law on Thursday, May 23, 2019.  

Other Kempe Initiatives

Throughout the session, The Kempe Foundation tracked over 40 bills and joined coalitions to support the following legislation:

  • HB 1122: CDPHE Maternal Mortality Review Committee
    • Status – Signed by the Governor.
  • HB 1193 Behavioral Health Support for High-risk Families
    • Status – Signed by the Governor.
  • HB 1194: School Discipline for Preschool through Second Grade
    • Status – Signed by the Governor.
  • HB 1197: Protect Social Workers’ Personal Information on the Internet
    • Status – Signed by the Governor.
  • HB 1262: State Funding for Full-day Kindergarten
    • Status – Signed by the Governor.
  • SB 049: Statute of Limitations Failure to Report Child Abuse
    • Status – Signed by the Governor.
  • SB 177: Background Checks for Persons Who Work with Children
    • Status – Passed and waiting for Governor’s signature.
  • SB 195: Child and Youth Behavioral Health System Enhancements
    • Status – Signed by the Governor.

Additionally, Kempe supported an amendment by Rep. Singer to SB19-228: Substance Use Disorder Prevention, to require the Colorado Department of Human Services to conduct research concerning the incidence of prenatal substance exposure or related newborn and family health and human services outcomes. SB19-228, as amended, has been signed by the Governor.

Budget Priorities

The Kempe Foundation actively supported several budget items and was successful in securing funding for our various priorities. These included:

  • $6,776,141 for the operation of the Child Welfare Training System.
  • $6.2 million for additional child welfare caseworkers.
  • Continued funding for operations of SafeCare within the Office of Early Childhood in the Colorado Department of Human Services.

The budget was signed by the Governor on April 18, 2019 and goes into effect at the start of the state fiscal year – July 1, 2019.

Kempe’s Child Abuse Prevention Month Activities

The Kempe Foundation was active at the State Capitol promoting Child Abuse Prevention Month. We participated in the drafting and introduction of the annual resolution to recognize Child Abuse Prevention Month on the House and Senate Floor. Both Foundation CEO John Faught and Kempe Center Executive Director Dr. Kathi Wells joined for the presentation in the Colorado General Assembly.

We also participated in a press conference with Governor Polis to acknowledge his proclamation of April as Child Abuse Prevention Month, and produced and distributed four one-page fact sheets to all one hundred legislators. The fact sheets included the announcement of Dr. Wells’ appointment as the Kempe Center Executive Director, as well as information on Kempe Center programs such the SafeCare program and ECHO Colorado.

Child Abuse, Neglect and Maltreatment: A Journey of Recovery

Helping children who are being abused or maltreated is one of the most challenging parts of being a pediatrician. In a new “AAP Voices” post, Andrew Sirotnak, MD, FAAP – Director of the Child Protection Team at Kempe/Children’s Hospital says it helps to remember how desperately children need trained physicians to help them and their families heal and thrive.

“As we evaluate and treat young patients with suspicious injuries, trying to make the difficult determination of whether human services should be involved, our overarching goal should be to prevent further harm,” he writes. Read the full article here.

Child Maltreatment and Trauma: Treating the Whole Family

Over the past three months, we’ve been exploring the topic of childhood trauma and its impact on mental health. Child maltreatment is the most common cause of trauma for youth and commonly the adult perpetrators, who were also subject to maltreatment in their youth. The perpetrator’s experience is then transmitted to their family. Trauma may also be the result of other events. Trauma is the reaction to frightening, often life-threatening, and violent experiences and while our focus is on child maltreatment, a traumatizing event may be experienced by any or all members of a family and then may lead to maltreatment, disruption of relationships and impede family functioning. Regardless of the trauma type, every trauma is a family trauma.

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network notes that all families experience trauma differently, and some factors such as a child’s age or the family’s culture or ethnicity may influence how the family copes and recovers from a traumatic event. Trauma changes families as they work to survive and adapt to their circumstances and environment. While this adjustment may be less difficult for some, for others the stress and burden cause them to feel isolated, overwhelmed, and less able to maintain vital family functions.

At Kempe, we believe that every family who has faced trauma deserves access to treatment so that they may heal and recover together. That’s why the Kempe Center’s IMHOFF Clinic takes a whole family approach and provides services for children, as well as their parents, caregivers and siblings who may also be dealing with symptoms related to stress, trauma and adversity.

We recently connected with Dr. Steven Berkowitz, a visiting professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus who is working in collaboration with Kempe to grow the IMHOFF Clinic’s whole family care approach.

Why is a family-focused approach a more effective way to address trauma?

Very often, children who experience trauma have parents or caregivers who were also traumatized in their youth and never received treatment to address the emotional, cognitive and behavioral consequences. Because trauma can be transmitted across generations, we see these children experience the same things that happened to their parents and caregivers. As a treatment provider, it is important to assess everyone in the family to identify any significant issues or psychological symptoms that may be related to an intergenerational history of trauma. In order for the child to successfully recover from their own traumatic experiences, we must take a whole family perspective and treat everyone in the family unit.

What is unique about your work at the IMHOFF Clinic?

We are building the IMHOFF Clinic into a family-focused clinic that provides services for children, youth and adults dealing with symptoms related to stress, trauma and adversity. Our multidisciplinary treatment team works together with children and their families in a much more integrated way. In the past, if we saw a parent or caregiver struggling alongside their child, we would have to refer them to another treatment provider in a completely different location. Here, the treatment is in one place and we offer a range of individualized therapies and pharmacology to any family members who need it.

What are you hoping to achieve at the IMHOFF Clinic?

This group is on the forefront of providing the most comprehensive and evidence-based assessments and treatments that focus on stress and trauma throughout the lifespan. We are working to develop a model program that helps to unify the various departments of the University of Colorado, School of Medicine and Children’s Hospital Colorado in order to better serve the families that come to Kempe for help. We’d also like to develop an effective home-based program for children and families so that treatment can happen in the least restrictive, most normative setting possible, with the goal being to help families live and function successfully at home.

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