Tagged: domestic violence

The Impact of Domestic Violence on Children and Youth

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Left unaddressed, exposure to violence has serious consequences for children’s ability to succeed in school, lead healthy lives, and contribute positively to their communities. This is especially true with exposure to parental domestic violence.

Children who witness domestic violence often experience the same things as the adult victims themselves, such as self-blame, nervousness, fear of abandonment, depression and other forms of behavioral and emotional distress. Additionally, children who have been exposed to violence are at a higher risk to engage in criminal behavior as adolescents.

Here in Colorado, there is a growing effort within our school system to address the trauma of youth who have experienced violence. Introduced by the Center on Domestic Violence at the University of Colorado Denver’s School of Public Affairs, the END Violence Project aims to better equip school personnel to identify students who have been exposed to, or have experienced, domestic and sexual assault and facilitate access to both intervention services for victims and prevention education services for all students.

Barbara Paradiso, Director for the Center, notes this emerging interest among schools and educators in developing school-wide, trauma-informed policies and protocols.

“Now, there’s much more understanding of the impact of trauma on young people and the importance of addressing it early. Our goal with the END Violence Project is to create long lasting and systemic change in our school communities so that trauma responses are minimized and the educational environment is enhanced for all students.”

Barbara also notes that beyond violence, those working directly with youth are coming to understand how connected many different issues are, from teen pregnancy to youth suicide.

“There are so many risk and resiliency factors that are common to the concerns we have for young people. We’ve begun to realize that breaking down the silos between our responses to these areas of concern is important to building truly effective trauma-informed services, and to creating response strategies that don’t overwhelm caregivers.”

To learn more about the END Violence Project and the Center on Domestic Violence, visit www.cdvdenver.org.

Impact of Domestic Violence on Parenting

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How does being a victim of domestic violence affect parenting?

This is the question Kempe is researching as part of a systematic review of the literature, a rigorous analysis examining all previous related research in order to synthesize the results.

Leading the project is Dr. Antonia Chiesa, with Kempe and Children’s Hospital Colorado Child Protection Team, who says, “We want to find out if there are residual effects from domestic violence even after the violence stops. “Simply removing the victim from the situation may not limit the impact, ” Dr. Chiesa added.

This project, now in its second year, is the first systematic review conducted at Kempe. Kempe experts from cross disciplines have been involved including a social worker, mental health professionals, pediatricians and doctors. Kempe also engaged leading systematic review expert Dr. Sabine Maguire at the University of Cardiff in Wales to assist with the project.

The process involves sifting through multiple databases to find studies and articles related to this topic and conducting an initial review of every relevant abstract – the team found more than 4000.

After the initial review, the Kempe team scanned 400 full studies to determine if the information was specific to this topic – they found over 100 potential studies.

Next, the research team conducted a critical review of each study to ensure that studies met narrowly defined inclusion criteria. These criteria are developed in order to assess quality of the research and ensure that the study answers the specific question.

“This has been a huge undertaking with many people on our staff spending time outside regular work hours to complete the study,” Chiesa said. “As we examine the research, we are noticing a differences in parenting discipline and research design methods – all of which must be accounted for in our evaluation.” Results are not final as the review is not complete. Preliminarily, it appears that domestic violence victimization may impact parenting. The results of the review will explore how this occurs and the strength of current evidence.

Kempe is in the process of documenting the findings and expects to publish the results of the review in 2016.