Tagged: child abuse and neglect

Updates from Under the Gold Dome

As of March 16, 2021:

The 2021 legislative session has officially entered its fifth week. There have been over 450 bills introduced with another 200-300 likely to be introduced before session ends this summer. Governor Polis and legislative leadership released the Colorado Recovery Plan, a $700 million package of stimulus funding for roads and bridges, small business support, revitalizing main streets, workforce development, broadband infrastructure, community supports, wildfire recovery and more. Key provisions include $5-$10 million for childcare capacity expansion, $8-$9 million for mental health screenings in schools, and $1-$2 million for the mental health hotline. 

LEGISLATION OF INTEREST

We have identified a list of child-focused policies that are of interest to the Kempe Foundation and are being considered by the Colorado Legislature this session. Below is an update on the status of these policy priorities:

HB 1099: Policies and Procedures to Identify Domestic Abuse.  Each year, approximately fifteen million children nationwide are exposed to domestic abuse and child abuse, which are often linked. In Colorado, nearly forty percent of child fatality cases reviewed by the child welfare fatality review team between 2014 and 2019 found domestic abuse to be a stressor. Due to the episodic nature of domestic abuse behaviors, it is challenging for child welfare caseworkers and others to connect domestic abuse to the harmful emotional and developmental impact on a child. Under current law, child welfare caseworkers do not have established training policies or assessment procedures to identify and assess situations when a child’s parent, legal guardian, or custodian exposes a child to their perpetration of domestic abuse. HB 1099 requires the department of human services to promulgate rules to implement assessment policies, procedures, and training for child welfare caseworkers to recognize and assess situations when a child’s parent, legal guardian, or custodian exposes a child to their perpetration of domestic abuse. The bill passed the House Public and Behavioral Health and Human Services Committee and is waiting to be heard in the House Appropriations Committee.

HB 1097: Establish Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) addresses multiple recommendations from the Colorado Behavioral Health Task Force (Task Force), created in 2019, related to the creation of a Behavioral Health Administration (BHA). The findings and recommendations of the Task Force indicate it is imperative to develop and implement an improved behavioral health system in Colorado. The BHA would be a single state agency to lead, promote, and administer the state’s behavioral health priorities. The bill requires the Department of Human Services (Department) to submit a plan for the creation and establishment of the BHA on or before November 1, 2021 to the Joint Budget Committee, and on or before January 30, 2022 to the Department’s committees of reference. The BHA under HB 1097 would prioritize all aspects of health, including wellness, and early interventions and supports that help people stay successfully and meaningfully connected to the community where they live, work, and play. There have been a handful of amendments clarifying the roles and responsibilities of the Department of Healthcare Policy and Financing and how they will navigate Medicaid and early diagnostic treatment for children. The bill passed the House Floor and is waiting to be heard in the Senate Health and Human Services Committee.

Marijuana. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment released a report in July 2020 that found a connection between high potency THC products and negative mental health outcomes. The developing brain is more vulnerable to the effects of THC, increasing the risk of addiction and other harm. As an organization dedicated to the safety and health of children, Kempe supports policies that address the growing risk of high potency THC products. Use of high potency products is also correlated with negative mental health outcomes such as anxiety, depression, and increased instances of psychosis and marijuana is the #1 substance found in youths age 15-19 who died by suicide. In response to these findings, Smart Colorado and Blue Rising are collaborating on a comprehensive bill to put in place stricter limitations on both the medical and recreational marijuana industry. The bill by Representative Caraveo and Senator Lundeen has not been introduced yet, but Kempe does support bringing it forward. The proponents and industry have been engaged in negotiations convened by Speaker Garnett to see if a path forward can be found on the forthcoming legislation.

FY 2021-2022 Budget. The Kempe Foundation successfully secured restoration of the $300,000 cut for the CARENetwork compensation that occurred last year. The JBC also approved the full request for the Child Welfare Training System ($6,797,102 Total Funds) with the Division of Child Welfare and the full funding for SafeCare in the Office of Early Childhood.

GOING FORWARD/NEED TO KNOW INFO AND EVENTS:

The Joint Budget Committee has finished its initial figure setting and on March 19th received the March Revenue Forecast from Legislative Council Staff (LCS) and the Governor’s Office of State Planning and Budgeting (OSPB). Bottom line is the state revenues are in a much better place than this time last year. Both forecasts revised their General Fund revenue projections upward. OSPB increased their revenue projections for FY2020-21 up $425 million and up $390.6 million for FY201-22 compared to the December forecast meaning if the General Assembly held all appropriations constant to FY2020-21 levels, the legislature would have $5.29 billion more to spend or save in FY2021-22. The JBC is finalized the budget and plans to introduce the budget on April 5th.

The Kempe Foundation is committed to advancing child-focused policies. We will continue to provide important policy updates throughout the 2021 Legislative Session. To receive Kempe Advocacy Updates via email, please sign up here.

 

The Impact of Domestic Violence on Children and Youth

Left unaddressed, exposure to violence has serious consequences for children’s ability to succeed in school, lead healthy lives, and contribute positively to their communities. This is especially true with exposure to parental domestic violence.

Children who witness domestic violence often experience the same things as the adult victims themselves, such as self-blame, nervousness, fear of abandonment, depression and other forms of behavioral and emotional distress. Additionally, children who have been exposed to violence are at a higher risk to engage in criminal behavior as adolescents.

Here in Colorado, there is a growing effort within our school system to address the trauma of youth who have experienced violence. Introduced by the Center on Domestic Violence at the University of Colorado Denver’s School of Public Affairs, the END Violence Project aims to better equip school personnel to identify students who have been exposed to, or have experienced, domestic and sexual assault and facilitate access to both intervention services for victims and prevention education services for all students.

Barbara Paradiso, Director for the Center, notes this emerging interest among schools and educators in developing school-wide, trauma-informed policies and protocols.

“Now, there’s much more understanding of the impact of trauma on young people and the importance of addressing it early. Our goal with the END Violence Project is to create long lasting and systemic change in our school communities so that trauma responses are minimized and the educational environment is enhanced for all students.”

Barbara also notes that beyond violence, those working directly with youth are coming to understand how connected many different issues are, from teen pregnancy to youth suicide.

“There are so many risk and resiliency factors that are common to the concerns we have for young people. We’ve begun to realize that breaking down the silos between our responses to these areas of concern is important to building truly effective trauma-informed services, and to creating response strategies that don’t overwhelm caregivers.”

To learn more about the END Violence Project and the Center on Domestic Violence, visit www.cdvdenver.org.

Impact of Domestic Violence on Parenting

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How does being a victim of domestic violence affect parenting?

This is the question Kempe is researching as part of a systematic review of the literature, a rigorous analysis examining all previous related research in order to synthesize the results.

Leading the project is Dr. Antonia Chiesa, with Kempe and Children’s Hospital Colorado Child Protection Team, who says, “We want to find out if there are residual effects from domestic violence even after the violence stops. “Simply removing the victim from the situation may not limit the impact, ” Dr. Chiesa added.

This project, now in its second year, is the first systematic review conducted at Kempe. Kempe experts from cross disciplines have been involved including a social worker, mental health professionals, pediatricians and doctors. Kempe also engaged leading systematic review expert Dr. Sabine Maguire at the University of Cardiff in Wales to assist with the project.

The process involves sifting through multiple databases to find studies and articles related to this topic and conducting an initial review of every relevant abstract – the team found more than 4000.

After the initial review, the Kempe team scanned 400 full studies to determine if the information was specific to this topic – they found over 100 potential studies.

Next, the research team conducted a critical review of each study to ensure that studies met narrowly defined inclusion criteria. These criteria are developed in order to assess quality of the research and ensure that the study answers the specific question.

“This has been a huge undertaking with many people on our staff spending time outside regular work hours to complete the study,” Chiesa said. “As we examine the research, we are noticing a differences in parenting discipline and research design methods – all of which must be accounted for in our evaluation.” Results are not final as the review is not complete. Preliminarily, it appears that domestic violence victimization may impact parenting. The results of the review will explore how this occurs and the strength of current evidence.

Kempe is in the process of documenting the findings and expects to publish the results of the review in 2016.